HEI's Lawrence Mbuagbaw named Carnegie African Diaspora Fellow

May 18, 2018, 10:00 AM by Joel Tiller
HEI’s Lawrence Mbuagbaw is one of 55 African-born scholars from the U.S. and Canada selected to travel to Africa to co-facilitate a series of capacity building initiatives at a number of the continent’s top universities.

McMaster University’s Lawrence Mbuagbaw is one of 55 African-born scholars from the U.S. and Canada selected to travel to Africa to co-facilitate a series of capacity building initiatives at a number of the continent’s top universities. 

Mbuagbaw, assistant professor in the Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact (HEI), was recently awarded a Fellowship from the Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program (CADFP)and will travel to South Africa’s Stellenbosch University in August to partner on a month-long project called Building Biostatics Capacity through Training and Mentorship.

“There is a shortness of research methods capacity on the African continent and this can be seen in the amount and quality of research that is being produced today,” Mbuagbaw explains. 

“This Fellowship offers me the chance to work directly with the faculty and students at Stellenbosch University, in an effort to enhance their curriculum and to demonstrate to everyone the value of this particular skill set and how to leverage it in future research collaborations.”

The CADFP, now in its fifth year, is designed to increase learning capacity at host institutions, and develop long-term, mutually-beneficial collaborations between universities in Africa and the U.S. and Canada. A total of 335 African Diaspora Fellowships have been awarded, since the program’s inception in 2013.

Mbuagbaw, a native of Cameroon, says the CADFP is an important approach to building capacity in low income countries across Africa.

“Picking researchers from the Diaspora to go back to where they came from is a critical,” Mbuagbaw says. “We have a deeper understanding of the local context, which allows for meaningful dialogue, especially when acting as a mentor to graduate students and early-career researchers.”