people

Faculty Impact

Alfonso Iorio

"Some 10,000 hemophiliac patients across all five continents can now get a recipe for treatment tailored to their individual needs in less time, at less cost and with less pain and discomfort than trial and error."

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Brian Haynes

"Communication and shared decision making are the last steps to getting evidence into practice."

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Deborah Cook

"With a compassionate, individual, sensitive approach, dying with dignity is possible."

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Geoffrey Norman

"We're scientists, first and foremost. We don't sit on curriculum committees. We're like a SWAT team. We shoot the place up and then we leave. It's what keeps us nimble."

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Gordon Guyatt

"It's about assessing the quality of the evidence and applying it to a specific patient, then balancing it with the patient's values and preferences to come up with a course of action that is right for them."

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Guillaume Pare

"Discovery of a gene linked to familial high cholesterol in the blood has led to the development of new drugs that could prevent heart disease within 10 years. If we can repeat this feat through the discovery of yet unknown genes, we might well make cardiovascular disease a thing of the past."

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Holger Schünemann

"GRADE's philosophy is simple. Evidence is worth nothing until we know what it is worth."

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John Lavis

"We sit on the best evidence in the world, and we have the means to get this into the hands of those who are making decisions. It may not be a cure for cancer, but it will help to deliver proven treatments in the most effective and efficient ways possible."

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Mitchell Levine

"Most research studies are designed to show whether a technology can work. We look at how well it performs when it's actually used."

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P.J. Devereaux

"We need to explore the potential of new technologies that can alert us earlier to patients who are at risk. My goal is to make surgery safer for everyone."

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Parminder Raina

"There are more than 5,000 Canadians who are now over 100 years old, and the number of seniors will double in the next two decades. What we learn about how they age, and what causes disease and disability as they grow older, could lead to new interventions and innovative programs that will keep us all living healthier for longer."

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Sonia Anand

"Focusing on high-risk groups allows us to learn more about the risk factors that affect us all."

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